A Change in the Weather

Date: 28th November – 10th December 2012

Where: Valdivia – Paillaco – Ruta 5 camp – Puerto Varas – Ancud – Castro – Puerto Montt – Pucon

Distance: 6334 to 6483 miles

To be honest we’ve had it lucky so far. Days of rain up till now could be counted on a pair of hands without much problem, and we’ve been on the road for over ten months! It had to change sometime, so why not encourage matters by going to the wettest place in Chile: Valdivia. When we arrived it was blazing hot sun and the eccentric hostal owner spoke of a drought…then the Brits turned up…all that changed over the following days as first cloud, then drizzle, then rain swept through. The weather couldn’t stop us enjoying our time in Valdivia though, especially the interesting Tsunami museum there.

Sea-lions and cormorants stand-by in anticipation of scraps from the fish market, Valdivia

Sea-lions and cormorants stand-by in anticipation of scraps from the fish market, Valdivia

Rowers can get an even closer view at the sea-lions

Rowers can get an even closer view at the sea-lions

Submariner Stavros reporting for duty!

Submariner Stavros reporting for duty!

The fort at Niebla which guards the sea entrance to Valdivia

The fort at Niebla which guards the sea entrance to Valdivia

'Hmmm, one of these wires is broken now which one?'

‘Hmmm, one of these wires is broken now which one?’

With the change in the weather (for the worse) and the change of month (December), we felt it was high time we changed our method of transport and got on our bikes again. The three days to Puerto Varas were pretty pointless, with little to see except a distant Coypu (kind of like a beaver) in one of the rivers we crossed. However the new Brooks saddle which Sarah gave Geoff for his birthday (via Nico and Stavros) performed perfectly, and our legs didn’t feel too weak. Wet and bedraggled we arrived at Puerto Varas before Stavros arrived from Bariloche (he went on a little sub-holiday within his holiday). Puerto Varas has one of the best views of the trip with the conical Volcan Osorno towering over Lago Llanquihue…we saw only clouds! Stavros arrived and we consoled ourselves by going out for pizza.

The Hannis-family home-made advent calendar which arrived from England with Stavros

The Hannis-family home-made advent calendar which arrived from England with Stavros

We regularly take shelter from the rain in bus stops to avoid getting the blues

We regularly take shelter from the rain in bus stops to avoid getting the blues

The road is long and pretty uninspiring, but it is good to be on the move again

The road is long and pretty uninspiring, but it is good to be on the move again

The new tent is simply palacial inside! A place to live if needs be!

The new tent is simply palacial inside! A place to live if needs be!

In our time around Osorno, we bought some fishing tackle and visited the waterfall near Petrohue. We tried our hand at fishing nearby, with Stavros teaching us the art of casting without plucking our eyes out. The closest to a bite was something nibbling one of the floats that looked like a piece of bread. Maybe we’ll put a fine loaf on the hooks next time!

Volcan Osorno makes an attempt to shrug off the clouds

Volcan Osorno makes an attempt to shrug off the clouds

Stavros at home in the kitchen of our Puerto Varas hostal

Stavros at home in the kitchen of our Puerto Varas hostal

Cascadas de Petrohué and Volcan Osorno

Cascadas de Petrohué and Volcan Osorno

We gave up on a clear view of Volcan Osorno and instead continued South to Puerto Montt by bike. Ever since Salta in the North of Argentina Geoff had been having problems with his low gears often being unable to use them when the hill got too steep and having to push or stand up in the saddle. This resulted in an explosion in the size of Geoffs’ thighs, but they will actually explode if he has to cycle without low gears for the Carreta Austral which is coming up. A tweak of the ‘b’ screw on the rear derailleur made things better, but not completely, and so in Puerto Montt we changed the whole derailleur as on closer inspection it was worn (wobbly). Geoff tested it on a street equal if not above the ‘steepest street in the world’ in Dunedin, New Zealand. It performed admirably, and fingers crossed our most ‘tricky to diagnose problem’ so far is fixed.

We took the bus to Ancud on the island of Chiloe, as the island is usually blessed with a continual drizzle that wouldn’t have been fun to cycle in. As it was, we managed to jinx the weather, and had three days of mostly glorious sun! The sun corresponded to the mood and we had a lovely three days on the island with everything going right. Just out of Ancud was a penguin colony, and a recommended taxi driver took us there and back via some spectacular viewpoints of the Pacific coast. On the way back he dropped us at a restaurant in town where (on his recommendation) we ordered two ‘Curantos’ for the three of us. Huge steaming plates of seafood, meat and potatoes, with the most delicious fishy stock came out, and we had one of our best experiences of local food of the whole trip.

The sun makes its first appearance on the ferry to Chiloe

The sun makes its first appearance on the ferry to Chiloe

Spot the penguin!

Spot the penguin!

Magellanic penguins off the coast of Chiloe

Magellanic penguins off the coast of Chiloe

About to tuck into a platter of Curanto, the traditional dish of Chiloe

About to tuck into a platter of Curanto, the traditional dish of Chiloe

In a packed day we hoisted our full stomachs onto another bus to Castro, the capital of Chiloe. Here we saw the stilt-houses of Chiloe called ‘Palafitos’, and some of the completely wooden churches for which the area is famous for. The final part of our Chilean culture extravaganza was a visit to a ‘Carreras a la Chilena’, which was traditional horse-racing, Chilean style: 1 on 1, side by side, zero H&S, cheap alcohol. We only stayed for one race, but thoroughly enjoyed the experience and will never forget a horse thundering past inches from our faces as it completes the 200m dash!

Colourful Chiloe potatoes in the market of Castro

Colourful Chiloe potatoes in the market of Castro

A row of palafitos (stilt-houses) in Castro

A row of palafitos (stilt-houses) in Castro

Visting the sea-side at Achao on Chiloe

Visting the sea-side at Achao on Chiloe

Achao church and Castro cathedral: completely made of wood!

Achao church and Castro cathedral: completely made of wood!

Wooden wall-tiles in Castro

Wooden wall-tiles in Castro

Grub at the races: empanada factory and LAMB!

Grub at the races: empanada factory and LAMB!

Making friends with the locals

Making friends with the locals

Close to the action! L: the winner of the 200m dash. R: second-place still pushing hard

Close to the action! L: the winner of the 200m dash. R: second-place still pushing hard

We returned to Puerto Montt to our bikes in the bus terminal left luggage. All was fine with them, and the next day we loaded them onto a bus for what we hope is the last time, to Pucon up North again. This region is famed for the huge Araucania tree forests in the shadow of volcanoes such as Villarica. We’ll spend about a week here with Stavros before parting ways and heading off to Argentina again.

On the ferry back to the mainland we get a glimpse of some of the snowiness we could see when we return South with our bikes.

On the ferry back to the mainland we get a glimpse of some of the snowiness we could see when we return South with our bikes.

The day after we arrive in Pucon, Volcan Villarica co-operates and revels itself from behind the clouds

The day after we arrive in Pucon, Volcan Villarica co-operates and reveals itself from behind the clouds

2 responses to “A Change in the Weather”

  1. Michelle Bowskill says :

    Happy Christmas Jeff and Sarah. How are you planning to spend the day? Best wishes from Andrew Michelle and Alex x

    • Geoff says :

      Hi all,
      Merry Christmas to you too! Thanks for thinking of us. We’re cozy in a hostal in San Martin de los Andes waiting out a patch of rainy weather. We’ll be all go tomorrow though as the sun is back! Are you spending this Christmas in Cov or in Turkey? Managed to grow some nice veg for Christmas dinner?
      Geoff and Sarah

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